FATHER’S MEMORIAL

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January 7th, 1927 to February 9, 2011

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17 thoughts on “FATHER’S MEMORIAL

  1. The best tribute to your dad is you. To look at the woman is to look at all of her life experiences. To raise a daughter who is smart and a free thinker, who is fair and compassionate tells his story along with your sharing your memories.

  2. I have often what kind of individual it requires to be a UN Peace Keeper. In full view, with clearly marked vehicles and uniforms, specially the Blue helmets. Seemed like all that made them an easier target. Pop musta been a cool, level headed guy, for I don’t believe they would station just any ol soldier for that duty. He musta done a good job cause we ain’t heard a peep outta Lebannon inna while. I can hear yer Dad now telling the Lebanese….”DON’T MAKE ME HAFTA COME BACK OVER HERE!”

    1. Thank you SO much for your comments, Steve. ((HUGS)) Brought a tear to my eye. My father’s military career started in earnest on the front lines of the Korean War and he retired from the army in 1974, on his 47th birthday,

  3. True, Debbie. And why don’t realize common people what is happening to civilians during wars? The Media is not allowed to tell them because the government needs to keep the population in that patriotic spending and sacrificing mode by glorifying “victory” and hide all the terrible human aspects, like maiming and killing children, starving and shooting the elderly and the unarmed and simply let them all starve to death. I lost several extended family members by starvation in East Prussia in 1945, after the war had ended in Germany. I myself also almost died of malnutrition as a young teenager.

    1. War is horrible for everyone, regardless of which side you are on. I don’t think anyone can truly understand the magnitude of it, unless they have experienced it themselves – as you have.

  4. Debbie, in your recent photographs I see your father….A lovely contribution to a father forever loved. I wish I could do the same for my father, honor him by posting pictures. I have one picture of him saved during my bad ordeals at the end of WWII. He was an honorable officer in the German Armee, a technical inspector of planes and weaponry, he also was on the front. Unfortunately, having worked under Hitler is nothing to be proud of, better not mentioned. I wonder whether Germany will ever be freed of that Nazi stigma. I just hold his memories close of my heart…..and that of my heroic mother.

    1. I understand how you feel Karin. Was horribly tormented myself as a young child, for something that had NOTHING to do with me OR my family, (they were against the Nazi regime). You went through such hell during and after the war and lived to tell the tale. Most people on this side of the Atlantic don’t realize that the general population of Germany was in misery also during that time. 🙁

  5. What a wonderful tribute to your Father Debbie and he was most certainly a handsome chap, and loving Father I can see that in your wedding photograph, beautiful smiles…

    My Father was a Bomber Pilot during
    the Second World War flying B-24 Liberators…

    Have a very nice Wednesday now Debbie 🙂

    Androgoth XXx